‘I am a citizen of the world…’

‘Everything I did, I saw it through a tropical eye’, said textile designer Althea McNish. ‘I am a citizen of the world and I am multicultural.’ We love the sentiment and are inspired by her work, and we’ve produced a limited edition range using her vibrant patterns that revolutionised postwar design in Britain.

McNish (1924-2020) came to the UK from Trinidad in 1950 and became a celebrated international textile designer and a key member of the Caribbean Artists Movement. She drew on her Trinidadian heritage to bring colour and joy to mid-century Britain. She said her imagination was ‘fed by folk art from many cultures, by architecture and technology, and by the flowers of the English countryside, which I transform into Caribbean flamboyance.’

You can see her amazing work at the William Morris Gallery in Walthamstow. ‘Colour is Mine’ is on until 11 September. Don’t miss it!

We’re making Bledsoe’s popular walkabout phone bags, pencil/glasses cases and card wallets using fabric designed by McNish and produced by Liberty in their classic tana lawn fabric. You can read more about her patterns in this tribute to McNish published by Liberty’s.

All are handmade in our Fulham Road workshop. Two colourways available in this lively midcentury modern print – blue/green and pink/orange. Note: Very limited supplies, but we will make more if you want them!

Walkabout phone bag     £25

Pencil/glasses case          £15 / £20

Card wallet                        £12.50

They make great gifts, and we can wrap and send them out. To order, contact us via the Bledsoe Bags website (www.bledsoebags.com) or email Margaret Doyle at margtdoyle@gmail.com, or contact us to arrange a visit to see us and our bags at Couture Collective, 659 Fulham Road, London SW6 5PY.

One thought on “‘I am a citizen of the world…’

  1. Reblogged this on The World Elsewhere and commented:
    Althea McNish (1924–2020) came to the UK from Trinidad in 1950 and became a celebrated international textile designer and a key member of the Caribbean Artists Movement. She drew on her Trinidadian heritage to bring colour and joy to mid-century Britain.

    Like

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